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Stone Carving: Part Five

Working Outside

Limestone blocks recycled from the Michigan Union have inspired a unique Art and Design class for the Winter 2011 semester. Under the guidance of Professor Michael Rodemer, the six students in this course are learning the stone carving process, from making clay models and forging their own tools to the techniques of carving and finishing limestone sculpture. The class, a unique opportunity for both philanthropy and learning, is intended to teach students more than just the techniques of stone carving: proceeds from the sale of the sculptures created will be used to give financial support to A&D students.

This post is by Michael Rodemer.

A warm day - let us work outside!

 

Eric peels off the stone, looking for the Möbius  form. Chip by chip, Courtney makes progress.

 

Having split the stone, Max takes a quick path to smoothing it.   Lindsay releasing a wolverine from the block.

 

Lindsay's claw chisel efficiently chops away the stone.

 

Sean's fish is coming to the surface.


 

Stone Carving: Part Four

Closing In

Limestone blocks recycled from the Michigan Union have inspired a unique Art and Design class for the Winter 2011 semester. Under the guidance of Professor Michael Rodemer, the six students in this course are learning the stone carving process, from making clay models and forging their own tools to the techniques of carving and finishing limestone sculpture. The class, a unique opportunity for both philanthropy and learning, is intended to teach students more than just the techniques of stone carving: proceeds from the sale of the sculptures created will be used to give financial support to A&D students.

This post is by Lindsay Balfour, a student in the Stone Carving class.

 

With less than a month left before the auction, our hands have never moved this fast. Many of us are still trying to work the kinks out of the limestone before the actual sculpturing process begins.

Max has been trying to cut his piece of stone in half, transforming the process into a three-week commitment. Halfway through class last Friday, Max managed to spilt the limestone.  His accomplishment is captured above, along with the remains of his stone and the tools that helped him get there.

Sean carves

 

Sean is furthest ahead. Pictured above, he is shown working halfway through shaping the overall form of his piece.

Courtney Drills

Courtney is strategically drilling holes to accelerate the shaping process and remove large chucks of stone at once.

 


 

Stone Carving: Part Three

Romancing the Stone

Limestone blocks recycled from the Michigan Union have inspired a unique Art and Design class for the Winter 2011 semester. Under the guidance of Professor Michael Rodemer, the six students in this course are learning the stone carving process, from making clay models and forging their own tools to the techniques of carving and finishing limestone sculpture. The class, a unique opportunity for both philanthropy and learning, is intended to teach students more than just the techniques of stone carving: proceeds from the sale of the sculptures created will be used to give financial support to A&D students.

This post is by Eric Harman, a student in the Stone Carving class.

 

With our sculpture designs set in stone so to speak, we continued our efforts to shape our rugged blocks. The progress is slow, small chips flying off with each hammer blow, it feels like one bicep is going to be twice the size of the other by the end of the semester. 

Some of us are romancing our stones with light shaping at the points of our chisels while other have taken to more aggressive negotiations with an impact drill.

Mother Nature tempted us with a taste of spring on Friday, nothing like stone carving in the afternoon sun!

carving in the sun

Carving Outside


 

Stone Carving: Part Two

Start Chiseling!

Limestone blocks recycled from the Michigan Union have inspired a unique Art and Design class for the Winter 2011 semester. Under the guidance of Professor Michael Rodemer, the six students in this course are learning the stone carving process, from making clay models and forging their own tools to the techniques of carving and finishing limestone sculpture. The class, a unique opportunity for both philanthropy and learning, is intended to teach students more than just the techniques of stone carving: proceeds from the sale of the sculptures created will be used to give financial support to A&D students.

This post is by Courtney Harring, a student in the Stone Carving class.

 

Many of us are in the finishing stages or finished with our clay models and we are ready to start chiseling.

 

But before we can begin we needed to do a little mapping out on the stone with chalk and charcoal.

Strapping on our stylish safety glasses, we are ready to get dusty! The first blow of the chisel is both exhilarating and nerve wracking all at the same time, and boy does the dust fly.

After the first initial hit, we are able to experiment with each of our handmade tools. We are also able to get a better feel for the material.

I think it's safe to say that we all have a much better appreciation for Michelangelo now!


 

Stone Carving: Part One

Making the Tools

Limestone blocks recycled from the Michigan Union have inspired a unique Art and Design class for the Winter 2011 semester. Under the guidance of Professor Michael Rodemer, the six students in this course are learning the stone carving process, from making clay models and forging their own tools to the techniques of carving and finishing limestone sculpture. The class, a unique opportunity for both philanthropy and learning, is intended to teach students more than just the techniques of stone carving: proceeds from the sale of the sculptures created will be used to give financial support to A&D students.

This post is by Sean Watts, a student in the Stone Carving class.

 

This week we learned to forge stone carving tools out of steel.  Each student was tasked with making a set of tools for themselves. 

 

 

The process required intense heat and the students forged their tools with hammers and anvils. 

 

 

The tools had to be made into specific shapes to fulfill different purposes.

 

 

The process took several hours and each one of the five tools was tempered. The students were given the chance to polish their tools to their liking. 

 

 

The next step was to finish up the clay models, and then transfer the outlines to the stone. Students could begin to carve once they had a final design.